Tag Archives: garden

Nectar of the Gods

Anyone looking into creating a wildlife garden will know how important nectar rich plants are when looking to attract bees and butterflies to the garden. In the summer, I have a pretty reasonable range of nectar rich flowers for insects but at the end of January my garden was looking bleak. I was still waiting for my snowdrops and crocuses to come up and wanted to make sure that I had a good source of food for any reckless insects who decided to brave the grey days of February.

They weren’t the worst bit of my garden by any stretch of the imagination, but these planters caught my eye because they were so close to the house. I had used them for growing blueberries, but some kind of pest or disease spread through my plants like a wild-fire in the summer… it started on the right hand leaves and within two weeks the left hand leaves were falling off and all three plants were dead. They were the perfect thing to reuse to brighten up the winter with a nectar rich container garden.

We went to the local garden centre and splashed out £15 on some primroses and bulbs that were growing in pots- daffodils, crocuses, hyacinths and the like. Then I spent a happy, drizzly afternoon in the garden with my under gardener (toddlers love to dig) emptying half of the ericaceous compost from the pot and filling them up with top soil in which we planted the bulbs.

Result? I have some early opening flowers which are benefitting from being sheltered by the house and opening way earlier than the same flowers in more exposed positions, the insects have something of a winter soup kitchen and the under gardener is oh so proud of her first foray into gardening.

For more on bee friendly gardening see some great tips from Friends of the Earth’s Bee Friendly Garden campaign.

My Tiny Wildlife Garden

I’ve always taken a fairly wildlife friendly approach to gardening. That I don’t use chemicals in the garden is a given, but my inherent laziness also means that the grass is only cut infrequently, piles of twigs grow ever higher next to the compost heap because they are easier to store than dispose of, and dandelions and cleavers are tolerated as a budget friendly source of guinea pig food.

Since falling pregnant with my daughter, I have to admit that I’ve been even more lax than usual. I had a problematic pregnancy, so other than naturalizing some crocus bulbs in my lawn when I was about eight weeks pregnant, I mostly left the garden to it. When she arrived, I was mostly too tired to bother.

Nearly two years later though, I want to make sure that the garden is an eco-friendly, wildlife friendly place for her to play. She loves being outdoors and joining in with whatever I’m doing in the garden so I want to create a toddler-safe nature haven that she can enjoy, somewhere perfect for watching bees, birds and butterflies, studying frogs, newts and beetles while learning to grow fruit and vegetables, just like I did with my father and grandparents.

We’re currently living in a two up, two down terrace, and looking to move to somewhere bigger so that a little girl can run around without coming into contact with a wall too quickly, so my current plans to rewild suburbia are on hold in as much as I’m aware that I’ll need to balance the need to create habitats and provide wildlife friendly sources of food with an aesthetic that will appeal to a wide range of buyers- so I’m thinking cottage garden lite with a decent patch of lawn.

This blog will be a place to keep track of our progress and the species that visit us.