Tag Archives: reducing waste

Five Little Things to reduce our environmental impact

I’ve recently returned back to work after a year’s maternity leave with my second child and it feels as though there’s been a big cultural shift. Everyone seems so much more aware than they did about reducing waste and their carbon footprints.

green waste recycling bin and brown garden waste bin
Our recycling bin and garden waste bins are currently the kids favourite toys for a game of peekaboo/tag

Not only are they are aware, but they are acting on it. Lots of my colleagues have gone full vegan, or vegetarian, and those who haven’t seem to be experimenting with flexitarianism to reduce their meat consumption. Conversations start up over tea in the kitchen about plant-based recipes people need to try, or ideas people have had for making an easy change that has made a positive environmental change without impacting on their lifestyle in any major way.

We’re still so far from being zero waste in my house, but sharing ideas and reading people’s blogs has helped me make small changes that feel though they’ve made a big difference in our household. Here are some of the things that I’ve done this year that have made me feel a bit better about how hard we’re treading on the earth.

Switching to a menstrual cup

This is one of those changes that feels like an all-around win without any compromises. I’ve found the Mooncup way more comfortable than using tampons or towels. The average woman will use 11,000 disposable sanitary items in her life time, and with a pack of sanitary towels containing the equivalent of 4 plastic bags, and the cotton etc used to produce tampons. Say you only bought one pack of tampax for your period (unlikely) across the course of a year that’s going to cost you £29.40 vs £21.99 for a Mooncup, but the cup can last for years. Wallet and planet friendly.

Buying second hand

Before #SecondHandSeptember made me so on trend, I decided at the start of the year to buy second hand clothes for myself and the girls as much as possible. I’ve got some things that I won’t buy second hand (underwear, shoes, swimwear) but on the whole, I’ve been buying all of the girls’ “new” clothes, and all of my clothes where I’ve needed them, second hand from eBay. According to Oxfam, 11 million clothing items end up in landfill every week, so it’s good to be able to give the children’s clothes that get grown out of so quickly a new lease of life. What my oldest grows out of is kept for her sister, and what she grows out of goes to her younger cousin.

Recycled Toilet Roll

Speaking of second hand, I read in July that toilet paper companies are increasingly using pulp from virgin wood in their toilet rolls and that the reduction in recyclable material is making toilet rolls less sustainable. I’d seen lots of adverts for Who Gives A Crap, a company that makes their rolls from 100% recycled materials and sustainably sourced bamboo, and donates 50% of their profits to improving sanitation in the developing world. Oh and they are plastic free. The Ethical Consumer also has recommendations for other sustainable brands.

Old School Milk

I was talking to a friend about reducing plastic waste in my kitchen, and she told me that she’d signed up for an old school milk man who delivered milk in glass bottles and took them away again to be reused and recycled. My partner pulled a long suffering face when I told him that I was signing us up for a milk delivery, and he wasn’t keen on the idea, but the children act like it’s Christmas morning when the milkman has been so he does like that. He can’t deny either that our recycling bin has been far more manageable now that it’s not full of plastic cartons or tetra packs. As a bonus, I like to add in the odd treat item every Friday, our milkman does baked goods, juices, even eco-friendly cleaning products. It is more expensive than supermarket milk, but it makes me feel better about how we’re feeding our family and affecting the environment. Making environmentally friendly choices definitely has an element of financial privilege so I do feel like it’s our responsibility as a family to make the best choices we can afford to and be mindful that some people won’t have that choice. If you want to find a milkman in your area, you can do so here

Growing our own cucumbers

I’ve been getting the garden in our new house set up to grow bits and pieces. Mostly because it’s a nice thing to do with the girls and I enjoy watching a relatively small seed turn into a giant plant with flowers which turn into pumpkins or squashes and take over the garden…. It’s real life magic. Anyway, this year I’ve grown cucumbers for the first time. I grew the variety cucino which is mini cucumbers and gave a few away to friends. The three plants I kept have thrived in a sunny spot outside and kept us in cucumbers all summer. I haven’t had to buy any, so no plastic wrapping, and they are quite small so none went to waste as they were picked as we needed them for salads, sandwiches and drinks. Money saving, reducing plastic, reducing food miles and reducing food waste at the same time. Oh and I companion planted them with marigolds and nasturtiums for aesthetics and we had sooooo many caterpillars, ladybirds and pollinators on the pot: great for biodiversity too.

What are your tips for living a more planet friendly lifestyle? I’m particularly interested in family friendly vegetarian recipes.